Women’s Equality Day

Women suffragists picketing in front of the White house.
Women suffragists picketing in front of the White house.

Women’s Equality Day, first designated by Congress in 1973 and proclaimed by Richard Nixon, the proclamation read in part:

The struggle for women’s suffrage, however, was only the first step toward full and equal participation of women in our Nation’s life. In recent years, we have made other giant strides by attacking sex discrimination through our laws and by paving new avenues to equal economic opportunity for women. Today, in virtually every sector of our society, women are making important contributions to the quality of American life….While we are making great strides to eliminate outright job discrimination because of sex in the Federal Government, we must recognize that people’s attitudes cannot be changed by laws alone. There still exist elusive prejudices born of mores and customs that stand in the way of progress for women. We must do all that we can to overcome these barriers against what is fair and right….

Forty-seven years later and 100 years since women gained the right to vote in the United States, there a still many prejudices that block women in our society.  Change has occurred, too slow for some, too fast for others, but it will continue.  It is up to us to make it happen.